WISE INTERVENTIONS

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Yeager, Purdie-Vaughns et al., 2014, Experiments 1 and 2: Framing critical feedback as a source of growth increased number of essays revised, decreased disciplinary citations, and were more likely to enroll in college among Black 7th grade students over years

Reference:

Yeager, D. S., Purdie-Vaughns, V., Garcia, J., Apfel, N., Brzustoski, P., Master, A., ... & Cohen, G. L. (2014). Breaking the cycle of mistrust: Wise interventions to provide critical feedback across the racial divide. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 143(2), 804.
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Summary:

Black and White 7th grade students turned in an essay, on which their teacher had provided critical feedback. When a paper-clipped note written by their teacher was appended to the marked-up essay reading, “I’m giving you these comments because I have high standards and I know that you can meet them” (versus “I’m giving you these comments so that you’ll have feedback on your paper”) this note (a) increased the percentage of White students who chose to revise their essay from 64% to 82%, and increased the percentage of Black students from 27% to 64% (raw percentages) (Experiment 1) and (b), when this revision was required, increased the quality of the revision. The greatest effects were observed for Black students who were mistrustful of school and, among these students, halted a 2-year decline in school trust over the rest of the school year. In a long-term follow-up from both experiments (Yeager, Purdie-Vaughns, et al., 2017), African American students who received the wise-feedback note received half has many disciplinary citations in 8th grade as those who did not, cutting the racial disparity in half, and were more likely to enroll in a four-year college on-time (64% versus 45%).

Psychological Process:

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

What is the Person Trying to Understand?

Other People and Groups

Approach to Desired Meaning

What about it?

Changing how other people appear to view the self

Psychological Question Addressed

Why did I receive critical feedback?

Psychological Process 2:

Need

What is the Person Trying to Understand?

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

What About it?

Approach to Desired Meaning

Approach to Desired Meaning

How?

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Process 3:

Need

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

Approach to Desired Meaning

How?

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Question Addressed

Why did I receive critical feedback?

Social Area:

Intervention Technique:

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Posted By:

Walton & Wilson, 2018