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Forscher et al., 2017: Learning about implicit bias increased concern about prejudice over two weeks and were more likely to object to racial stereotypes two years later

Reference:

Forscher, P. S., Mitamura, C., Dix, E. L., Cox, W. T., & Devine, P. G. (2017). Breaking the prejudice habit: Mechanisms, timecourse, and longevity. Journal of experimental social psychology, 72, 133-146.
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Summary:

Extending Devine et al., 2012, a replication study found no reduction in implicit prejudice over two weeks but sustained increases in concern about prejudice over this period. A subsample recruited two years later showed that treated participants were more likely to object in an online forum to an essay endorsing racial stereotyping (79% vs. 48%).

Psychological Process:

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

What is the Person Trying to Understand?

Other People and Groups

Approach to Desired Meaning

What about it?

Changing beliefs about social groups and group conflict

Psychological Process 2:

Need

What is the Person Trying to Understand?

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

What About it?

Approach to Desired Meaning

Approach to Desired Meaning

How?

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Process 3:

Need

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

Approach to Desired Meaning

How?

Psychological Question Addressed

Social Area:

Intervention Technique:

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Posted By:

Walton & Wilson, 2018