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Burnette & Finkel, 2012: Learning about losing weight with effort increased weight loss when experiencing more dieting difficulties among adults over 12 weeks

Reference:

Burnette, J. L., & Finkel, E. J. (2012). Buffering against weight gain following dieting setbacks: An implicit theory intervention. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 48(3), 721-725.
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Summary:

People trying to lose weight were (1) led to view weight as changeable with effort (implicit-theories treatment); (2) received high quality information about scientifically validated means to lose weight (e.g., reduced pace of eating, mechanisms linking exercise to weight loss) (knowledge treatment); or (3) assigned to a control condition. Over a 12-week assessment period, both treatments prevented weight gain observed in the control condition. Additionally, whereas people in the knowledge treatment and control conditions gained more weight when they experienced more severe dieting setbacks (e.g., overeating at a party), those in the implicit-theories treatment lost more weight when they experienced greater setbacks.

Psychological Process:

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

What is the Person Trying to Understand?

Selves (My Own and Others')

How?

Psychological Question Addressed

Can weight change?Can weight change?

Psychological Question Addressed

Can weight change?

Psychological Process 2:

Need

What is the Person Trying to Understand?

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

What About it?

Approach to Desired Meaning

Approach to Desired Meaning

How?

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Process 3:

Need

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

Approach to Desired Meaning

How?

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Question Addressed

Can weight change?

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Intervention Technique:

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Posted By:

Walton & Wilson, 2018