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Son Hing et al., 2002: Prompting hypocrisy about prejudice towards Asians increased guilt and discomfort and decreased prejudice among high-implicit prejudice undergraduates

Reference:

Hing, L. S. S., Li, W., & Zanna, M. P. (2002). Inducing hypocrisy to reduce prejudicial responses among aversive racists. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 38(1), 71-78.
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Summary:

Undergraduates first advocated a nonprejudicial stance toward Asians and then, in the hypocrisy condition, wrote “about two situations in which you reacted more negatively to an Asian person than you thought you should or treated an Asian person in a prejudiced manner.” As compared to those who did not complete the hypocrisy induction, people in the hypocrisy condition with high implicit but low explicit prejudice against Asians felt more guilt and discomfort and, subsequently, advocated smaller cuts to the Asian Student Association. There was no condition difference for people low in implicit and explicit prejudice.

Psychological Process:

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

What is the Person Trying to Understand?

To See the Self as Adequate

Psychological Question Addressed

Am I not living up to my attitudes or values?

Psychological Process 2:

Need

What is the Person Trying to Understand?

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

What About it?

Approach to Desired Meaning

Approach to Desired Meaning

How?

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Process 3:

Need

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

Approach to Desired Meaning

How?

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Question Addressed

Am I not living up to my attitudes or values?

Social Area:

Intervention Technique:

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Posted By:

Walton & Wilson, 2018