WISE INTERVENTIONS

<go to database

Hudley & Graham, 1993: Learning to understand ambiguous social interactions as not hostile reduced hostility and aggression among African American elementary students over two weeks

Reference:

Hudley, C., & Graham, S. (1993). An attributional intervention to reduce peer-directed aggression among African-American boys. Child development, 64(1), 124-138.
Download PDF

Summary:

African American 3rd through 5th grade boys in low-income schools identified by teacher ratings and peer nominations as aggressive completed a 12-lesson intervention using role-playing, discussion of personal experiences, and other experiences to encourage them (1) to accurately understand cues provided by others in social interactions, (2) to attribute ambiguous negative social encounters to nonhostile intentions, and (3) to respond appropriately. As compared to children in two control conditions, this intervention reduced perceptions of hostility in hypothetical peer encounters and teacher ratings of aggression two weeks after the intervention.

Psychological Process:

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

What is the Person Trying to Understand?

Personal and Social Experiences

Psychological Question Addressed

How can I better manage this conflict?

Psychological Process 2:

Need

What is the Person Trying to Understand?

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

What About it?

Approach to Desired Meaning

Approach to Desired Meaning

How?

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Process 3:

Need

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

Approach to Desired Meaning

How?

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Question Addressed

How can I better manage this conflict?

Social Area:

Intervention Technique:

Share This Post:

Posted By:

Walton & Wilson, 2018