WISE INTERVENTIONS

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Brummelman et al., 2014: Writing about receiving unconditional regard from peers before getting final grades reduced feelings of shame among poor-performing students

Reference:

Brummelman, E., Thomaes, S., Walton, G. M., Poorthuis, A. M., Overbeek, G., de Castro, B. O., & Bushman, B. J. (2014). Unconditional regard buffers children’s negative self-feelings. Pediatrics, peds-2013.
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Summary:

Asking adolescents several weeks before receiving final course grades to write for 15-minutes about times when they had experienced unconditional regard from peers (“who always accept and value you, no matter how you behave or how good you are at something”) reduced feelings of shame among students who later received poor grades.

Psychological Process:

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

What is the Person Trying to Understand?

To Feel Connected, Included, Respected, and Valued by Others

Approach to Desired Meaning

What about it?

Remedy Threats to Belonging that Undermine Functioning

Psychological Question Addressed

Am I connected to others?

Psychological Process 2:

Need

What is the Person Trying to Understand?

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

What About it?

Approach to Desired Meaning

Approach to Desired Meaning

How?

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Process 3:

Need

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

Approach to Desired Meaning

How?

Psychological Question Addressed

Bolstering beliefs about social connectedness

Psychological Question Addressed

Am I connected to others?

Social Area:

Intervention Technique:

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Posted By:

Walton & Wilson, 2018