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Murray & Segal, 1994: Writing about traumatic life experiences reduced painful thoughts, but increased negative mood among undergraduates

Reference:

Murray, E. J., & Segal, D. L. (1994). Emotional processing in vocal and written expression of feelings about traumatic experiences. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 7(3), 391-405.
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Summary:

Asking undergraduates to write or talk about personally traumatic life events for 20-minutes/day on 4 consecutive days reduced the self-reported pain people experienced in thinking about this event over this period. However, during this period people experienced increasing levels of negative mood and decreasing levels of positive mood, relative to students who wrote or talked about trivial events.

Psychological Process:

Psychological Process 2:

Need

What is the Person Trying to Understand?

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

What About it?

Approach to Desired Meaning

Approach to Desired Meaning

How?

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Process 3:

Need

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

Approach to Desired Meaning

How?

Psychological Question Addressed

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Posted By:

Walton & Wilson, 2018