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Frattaroli et al., 2011: Writing thoughts and feeling about graduate school entrace exams decreased depressive symptoms among students days later

Reference:

Frattaroli, J., Thomas, M., & Lyubomirsky, S. (2011). Opening up in the classroom: Effects of expressive writing on graduate school entrance exam performance. Emotion, 11(3), 691.
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Summary:

Students preparing for the graduate school entrance exams (GRE, MCAT, LSAT, or PCAT) given the opportunity to write about their “deepest thoughts and feelings” about the upcoming exam, as compared to those in a neutral writing condition (activities they had participated in during the prior 24 hours), reported lower depressive symptoms 3 days before the exam, scored higher (50th percentile vs. 41st percentile), and were more satisfied with their score. There was no difference in depressive symptoms 8 days after the exam. Exploratory analyses found that although the reduction in depressive symptoms was found for all testtakers the rise in test performance was found for student taking the MCAT or LSAT;

Psychological Process:

Psychological Process 2:

Need

What is the Person Trying to Understand?

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

What About it?

Approach to Desired Meaning

Approach to Desired Meaning

How?

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Process 3:

Need

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

Approach to Desired Meaning

How?

Psychological Question Addressed

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Posted By:

Walton & Wilson, 2018