WISE INTERVENTIONS

<go to database

Yeager, Purdie-Vaughns et al., 2014, Experiment 3: Framing critical feedback as a source of growth improved academic performance among African American high schoolers

Reference:

Yeager, D. S., Purdie-Vaughns, V., Garcia, J., Apfel, N., Brzustoski, P., Master, A., ... & Cohen, G. L. (2014). Breaking the cycle of mistrust: Wise interventions to provide critical feedback across the racial divide. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 143(2), 804.
Download PDF

Summary:

High school students read stories from other students about receiving critical feedback, which emphasized understanding criticism as helping students achieve a higher level and given with this purpose, and practiced these attributions by interpreting critical feedback on another student’s essay. This raised end-of-term core academic grades for Black students, reducing the achievement gap with White students by 39%, and reduced the percentage of classes in which Black students performed at a D or lower level from 43% to 23%.

Psychological Process:

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

What is the Person Trying to Understand?

Other People and Groups

Approach to Desired Meaning

What about it?

Changing how other people appear to view the self

Psychological Question Addressed

Why did I receive critical feedback?

Psychological Process 2:

Need

What is the Person Trying to Understand?

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

What About it?

Approach to Desired Meaning

Approach to Desired Meaning

How?

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Process 3:

Need

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

Approach to Desired Meaning

How?

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Question Addressed

Why did I receive critical feedback?

Social Area:

Intervention Technique:

Share This Post:

Posted By:

Walton & Wilson, 2018