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Dickerson et al., 1992: Prompting hypocritical feelings about length of showers reduced shower time among female swimmers

Reference:

Dickerson, C. A., Thibodeau, R., Aronson, E., & Miller, D. (1992). Using Cognitive Dissonance to Encourage Water Conservation 1. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 22(11), 841-854.
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Summary:

Female swimmers exiting a pool were led to feel hypocritical about the length of their showers by both (a) agreeing to help out with campus conservation efforts by signing their name to a flyer saying “Please conserver water. Take shorter showers,” and (b) responding to survey items asking, for instance, “When you take showers, do you ALWAYS make them as short as possible, or do you sometimes linger longer than necessary?” This reduced shower time relative to a condition in which swimmers did neither (a) nor (b). Swimmers who did either (a) or (b) did not differ from either the hypocrisy or the control group. Additionally, whereas 35% of swimmers in the control group turned off the shower while shampooing or soaping up, 70% of those who did (a), (b), or both did.

Psychological Process:

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

What is the Person Trying to Understand?

To See the Self as Adequate

Psychological Question Addressed

Am I not living up to my attitudes or values?

Psychological Process 2:

Need

What is the Person Trying to Understand?

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

What About it?

Approach to Desired Meaning

Approach to Desired Meaning

How?

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Process 3:

Need

What Desired Meaning is At Stake?

Approach to Desired Meaning

How?

Psychological Question Addressed

Psychological Question Addressed

Am I not living up to my attitudes or values?

Social Area:

Intervention Technique:

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Posted By:

Walton & Wilson, 2018